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winchestheart  


embarrassmental:

narcotic:

what if people named their kids when they turn 18 so the kid has a name that fits its personality

image

officialfemme:

the city on the edge of forever is a cinematic masterpiece

officialfemme:

the city on the edge of forever is a cinematic masterpiece

thrashturbate:

10/10 would bang.

But also:

10/10 would care for you
10/10 would tuck you in
10/10 would cuddle
10/10 would make sure you get to sleep okay
10/10 would make you breakfast in the morning

geothebio:

[sleeps for 70 years to avoid adulthood and become captain america]

pemsylvania:

the best place to get in an argument with someone is on a hill so you can roll away if you start losing

7/24/14: [X]

notinmyyard:

open, closed

carnivaloftherandom:

socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Auto-reblog.

carnivaloftherandom:

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Auto-reblog.

nuditea:

listen if you insult cats you are also insulting me


____-_Women between fifteen and forty-four are more likely to be injured or die from male violence than from traffic accidents, cancer, malaria, and the effects of war combined.

A difficult, important piece by Ariel Levy for The New Yorker.

Help do something about it here.

(via explore-blog)

I swear to fuck if someone tries to come up in here and be like, “SOME men are violent towards women.” NO. SOME men aren’t violent towards women. Read the article, check your shit.

(via lagoonmonsterlove)

My previous anons protesting me writing off the majority of men as being violent. Read this and then get off the internet forever.

(via factualfeminist)

I just want to add the sentence following the above quote in the article, "This sustained brutality would be impossible without a culture that enables it: a value system in which women are currency, and sex is something that men get—or take—from them."

(via bahormel)

beeevaa:

Finally realized who Healy reminded me of.